Academic Writing Performance and Writing Strategy Use

نوع مقاله: مقاله پژوهشی

نویسندگان

1 گروه آموزشی زبان انگلیسی، دانشگاه فرهنگیان سنندج، ایران

2 گروه آموزشی علوم تربیتی، دانشگاه فرهنگیان سنندج، ایران

چکیده

Background: Academic reading and writing proficiency especially in globally accepted languages such as English is a key contributor to university students’ success in any disciplinary area. .Reading and writing strategies play a vital role in the development of reading and writing skills. Despite the rapidly expanding body of research on various aspects of reading and writing, only a few studies have focused on documenting the association between language proficiency and writing or reading strategies.
Purpose: This article describes a study into university students’ use of writing strategies. The study examined the relationship between writing strategy use and writing proficiency, looking at how three proficiency groups differ in writing strategies.
Methods: In this cross-sectional survey study, 194 undergraduate students enrolled in an English writing course at a public university took a two-part writing test, followed by a 26-item writing strategy scale. The study employed quantitative data analyses. Descriptive statistics were used for describing the overall use of different writing strategies, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the differences in writing strategies among three different writing proficiency groups.  
Results: The students reported a relatively high degree of writing strategy use. The study found that meta-cognitive strategy was the most frequently used strategy. The results also revealed that high writing proficiency group reported a significantly higher level of writing strategy use than middle writing proficiency group who in turn reported a significantly higher usage of these strategies than low writing proficiency one.
Conclusions: Students with high writing proficiency had higher writing strategy use than those with low writing proficiency. However, further research is needed to confirm these conclusions.
Implication: The findings have some implications writing instruction. Teachers can help students to improve their writing by teaching appropriate and effective strategies.

کلیدواژه‌ها

موضوعات


عنوان مقاله [English]

Academic Writing Performance and Writing Strategy Use

نویسندگان [English]

  • Saeid Raoofi 1
  • Saifullah Rahmani 2
  • Massoud Binandeh 2
1 Department of English Language Teaching, Farhangian University, Sanandaj, Iran
2 Department of Educational Science, Farhangian University Sanandaj, Iran
چکیده [English]

Background: Academic reading and writing proficiency especially in globally accepted languages such as English is a key contributor to university students’ success in any disciplinary area. .Reading and writing strategies play a vital role in the development of reading and writing skills. Despite the rapidly expanding body of research on various aspects of reading and writing, only a few studies have focused on documenting the association between language proficiency and writing or reading strategies.
Purpose: This article describes a study into university students’ use of writing strategies. The study examined the relationship between writing strategy use and writing proficiency, looking at how three proficiency groups differ in writing strategies.
Methods: In this cross-sectional survey study, 194 undergraduate students enrolled in an English writing course at a public university took a two-part writing test, followed by a 26-item writing strategy scale. The study employed quantitative data analyses. Descriptive statistics were used for describing the overall use of different writing strategies, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the differences in writing strategies among three different writing proficiency groups.  
Results: The students reported a relatively high degree of writing strategy use. The study found that meta-cognitive strategy was the most frequently used strategy. The results also revealed that high writing proficiency group reported a significantly higher level of writing strategy use than middle writing proficiency group who in turn reported a significantly higher usage of these strategies than low writing proficiency one.
Conclusions: Students with high writing proficiency had higher writing strategy use than those with low writing proficiency. However, further research is needed to confirm these conclusions.
Implication: The findings have some implications writing instruction. Teachers can help students to improve their writing by teaching appropriate and effective strategies.

کلیدواژه‌ها [English]

  • second language writing
  • language learning strategies
  • English as a second language
  • language proficiency
  • undergraduate students

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